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Nervous System Anatomy
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  1. Related Content
  2. Nervous system - Wikipedia
  3. Nervous system

When a neuron sends a message to another neuron, it sends an electrical signal down the length of its axon. At the end of the axon, the electrical signal changes to a chemical signal. The neurotransmitters move the signal through the synapse to the neighboring dendrite, which converts the chemical signal back into an electrical signal. The electrical signal then travels through the neuron and goes through the same conversion processes as it moves to neighboring neurons.

The nervous system also includes non-neuron cells, called glia pronounced GLEE-uh. Glia perform many important functions that keep the nervous system working properly. For example, glia:. The brain is made up of many networks of communicating neurons and glia. What are some different areas of neuroscience? Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email. The nervous system has two main parts: The central nervous system is made up of the brain and spinal cord.

The peripheral nervous system is made up of nerves that branch off from the spinal cord and extend to all parts of the body. Dendrites are responsible for receiving most of the input from other neurons. Looking at nervous tissue, there are regions that predominantly contain cell bodies and regions that are largely composed of just axons.

These two regions within nervous system structures are often referred to as gray matter the regions with many cell bodies and dendrites or white matter the regions with many axons. Figure 2 demonstrates the appearance of these regions in the brain and spinal cord. Gray matter is not necessarily gray. It can be pinkish because of blood content, or even slightly tan, depending on how long the tissue has been preserved. But white matter is white because axons are insulated by a lipid-rich substance called myelin.

Actually, gray matter may have that color ascribed to it because next to the white matter, it is just darker—hence, gray. The distinction between gray matter and white matter is most often applied to central nervous tissue, which has large regions that can be seen with the unaided eye. When looking at peripheral structures, often a microscope is used and the tissue is stained with artificial colors.

That is not to say that central nervous tissue cannot be stained and viewed under a microscope, but unstained tissue is most likely from the CNS—for example, a frontal section of the brain or cross section of the spinal cord. Regardless of the appearance of stained or unstained tissue, the cell bodies of neurons or axons can be located in discrete anatomical structures that need to be named. Those names are specific to whether the structure is central or peripheral.

A localized collection of neuron cell bodies in the CNS is referred to as a nucleus. In the PNS, a cluster of neuron cell bodies is referred to as a ganglion. Figure 3 indicates how the term nucleus has a few different meanings within anatomy and physiology. It is the center of an atom, where protons and neutrons are found; it is the center of a cell, where the DNA is found; and it is a center of some function in the CNS. Terminology applied to bundles of axons also differs depending on location. A bundle of axons, or fibers, found in the CNS is called a tract whereas the same thing in the PNS would be called a nerve.

There is an important point to make about these terms, which is that they can both be used to refer to the same bundle of axons. The most obvious example of this is the axons that project from the retina into the brain. Those axons are called the optic nerve as they leave the eye, but when they are inside the cranium, they are referred to as the optic tract. There is a specific place where the name changes, which is the optic chiasm, but they are still the same axons Figure 4. A similar situation outside of science can be described for some roads.

Table 1 helps to clarify which of these terms apply to the central or peripheral nervous systems. This is a tool to see the structures of the body not just the nervous system that depends on magnetic fields associated with certain atomic nuclei. The utility of this technique in the nervous system is that fat tissue and water appear as different shades between black and white. Because white matter is fatty from myelin and gray matter is not, they can be easily distinguished in MRI images.

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Visit the Nobel Prize web site to play an interactive game that demonstrates the use of this technology and compares it with other types of imaging technologies. Also, the results from an MRI session are compared with images obtained from X-ray or computed tomography. How do the imaging techniques shown in this game indicate the separation of white and gray matter compared with the freshly dissected tissue shown earlier?

The nervous system can also be divided on the basis of its functions, but anatomical divisions and functional divisions are different. The CNS and the PNS both contribute to the same functions, but those functions can be attributed to different regions of the brain such as the cerebral cortex or the hypothalamus or to different ganglia in the periphery.


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The problem with trying to fit functional differences into anatomical divisions is that sometimes the same structure can be part of several functions. For example, the optic nerve carries signals from the retina that are either used for the conscious perception of visual stimuli, which takes place in the cerebral cortex, or for the reflexive responses of smooth muscle tissue that are processed through the hypothalamus.

There are two ways to consider how the nervous system is divided functionally. First, the basic functions of the nervous system are sensation, integration, and response. Secondly, control of the body can be somatic or autonomic—divisions that are largely defined by the structures that are involved in the response. There is also a region of the peripheral nervous system that is called the enteric nervous system that is responsible for a specific set of the functions within the realm of autonomic control related to gastrointestinal functions. The nervous system is involved in receiving information about the environment around us sensation and generating responses to that information motor responses.

The nervous system can be divided into regions that are responsible for sensation sensory functions and for the response motor functions. But there is a third function that needs to be included. Sensory input needs to be integrated with other sensations, as well as with memories, emotional state, or learning cognition.

Some regions of the nervous system are termed integration or association areas. The process of integration combines sensory perceptions and higher cognitive functions such as memories, learning, and emotion to produce a response. The first major function of the nervous system is sensation—receiving information about the environment to gain input about what is happening outside the body or, sometimes, within the body.

The sensory functions of the nervous system register the presence of a change from homeostasis or a particular event in the environment, known as a stimulus.

Nervous system - Wikipedia

The stimuli for taste and smell are both chemical substances molecules, compounds, ions, etc. There are actually more senses than just those, but that list represents the major senses. Those five are all senses that receive stimuli from the outside world, and of which there is conscious perception.

Additional sensory stimuli might be from the internal environment inside the body , such as the stretch of an organ wall or the concentration of certain ions in the blood. The nervous system produces a response on the basis of the stimuli perceived by sensory structures. An obvious response would be the movement of muscles, such as withdrawing a hand from a hot stove, but there are broader uses of the term.

The nervous system can cause the contraction of all three types of muscle tissue. For example, skeletal muscle contracts to move the skeleton, cardiac muscle is influenced as heart rate increases during exercise, and smooth muscle contracts as the digestive system moves food along the digestive tract. Responses also include the neural control of glands in the body as well, such as the production and secretion of sweat by the eccrine and merocrine sweat glands found in the skin to lower body temperature.

Responses can be divided into those that are voluntary or conscious contraction of skeletal muscle and those that are involuntary contraction of smooth muscles, regulation of cardiac muscle, activation of glands. Voluntary responses are governed by the somatic nervous system and involuntary responses are governed by the autonomic nervous system, which are discussed in the next section.

Stimuli that are received by sensory structures are communicated to the nervous system where that information is processed.

Nervous system

This is called integration. Stimuli are compared with, or integrated with, other stimuli, memories of previous stimuli, or the state of a person at a particular time. This leads to the specific response that will be generated. Seeing a baseball pitched to a batter will not automatically cause the batter to swing. The trajectory of the ball and its speed will need to be considered.

Maybe the count is three balls and one strike, and the batter wants to let this pitch go by in the hope of getting a walk to first base. The nervous system can be divided into two parts mostly on the basis of a functional difference in responses.

The somatic nervous system SNS is responsible for conscious perception and voluntary motor responses. Voluntary motor response means the contraction of skeletal muscle, but those contractions are not always voluntary in the sense that you have to want to perform them. Some somatic motor responses are reflexes, and often happen without a conscious decision to perform them. The autonomic nervous system ANS is responsible for involuntary control of the body, usually for the sake of homeostasis regulation of the internal environment.


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Sensory input for autonomic functions can be from sensory structures tuned to external or internal environmental stimuli. The motor output extends to smooth and cardiac muscle as well as glandular tissue. The role of the autonomic system is to regulate the organ systems of the body, which usually means to control homeostasis. Sweat glands, for example, are controlled by the autonomic system. When you are hot, sweating helps cool your body down. That is a homeostatic mechanism. But when you are nervous, you might start sweating also. That is not homeostatic, it is the physiological response to an emotional state.

There is another division of the nervous system that describes functional responses. The enteric nervous system ENS is responsible for controlling the smooth muscle and glandular tissue in your digestive system. It is sometimes valid, however, to consider the enteric system to be a part of the autonomic system because the neural structures that make up the enteric system are a component of the autonomic output that regulates digestion. There are some differences between the two, but for our purposes here there will be a good bit of overlap.

See Figure 5 for examples of where these divisions of the nervous system can be found.


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