Read PDF The Girl in the Photo

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Girl in the Photo file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Girl in the Photo book. Happy reading The Girl in the Photo Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Girl in the Photo at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Girl in the Photo Pocket Guide.
See a Problem?
Contents:
  1. Best of NBC News
  2. ​The girl in the picture
  3. A War Of Pointless Brutality
  4. Data Protection Choices
  5. Nick Ut's 'napalm girl' photo was published 42 years ago - Poynter

Best of NBC News

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover.

​The girl in the picture

Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. On June 8, , nine-year-old Kim Phuc, severely burned by napalm, ran from her blazing village in South Vietnam and into the eye of history. Her photograph - one of the most unforgettable images of the twentieth century - was seen around the world and helped turn public opinion against the Vietnam War.

This book is the story of how that photograph came to be - and the sto On June 8, , nine-year-old Kim Phuc, severely burned by napalm, ran from her blazing village in South Vietnam and into the eye of history. This book is the story of how that photograph came to be - and the story of what happened to that girl after the camera shutter closed. Award-winning biographer Denise Chong's portrait of Kim Phuc - who eventually defected to Canada and is now a UNESCO spokesperson - is a rare look at the Vietnam War from the Vietnamese point-of-view and one of the only books to describe everyday life in the wake of this war and to probe its lingering effects on all its participants.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages.

A War Of Pointless Brutality

Published August 1st by Penguin Books first published September 1st More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Girl in the Picture , please sign up. Does anyone have discussion questions for a book club review of this book? See 1 question about The Girl in the Picture…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order.

The girl in the photo

Denise Chong's The Girl In The Picture looks at the life of Kim Phuc, the Vietnamese woman whose terrified, naked, nine-year-old self was immortalized in a famous war photograph taken in June of But th Denise Chong's The Girl In The Picture looks at the life of Kim Phuc, the Vietnamese woman whose terrified, naked, nine-year-old self was immortalized in a famous war photograph taken in June of View all 8 comments. Dec 31, Srividya rated it really liked it Shelves: reading-challenge , owned , tower-teams-iv , non-fiction , world-lit , genre However, despite this, generations upon generations are involved in this madness to the extent that peace, today, has become a luxury and not a right.

Writing about the different wars that humans have fought from the beginning of time is a popular genre and to be honest, is also a genre that I love a lot. Similarly, memoirs of individuals who have lived through strife and conflict and have emerged victorious is another huge fascination and inspiration for me. So, it is obvious that I would both read and like this current book, which talks about the Vietnam war and about a survivor from that war, where she survived despite the odds being against her.

This is the story of a nine year old girl, who was the victim of napalm burning during the Vietnam war and who survived to tell the tale of her sufferings and the horrors of war that she had witnessed as a child. It is a tale of struggle, pain, redemption, forgiveness and finally love. A tale that will move the hearts of even those who claim to be hardened.

An account that is both stark and pragmatic in its narration whilst also being a tale of inspiration to many. Truer words have yet to be spoken, especially when you read this book, you feel that being a survivor has its own set of issues, which can be quite morbid at times. If one were to really look at the experiences of survivors of war, one would see and accept that maybe death is the better deal.

Nevertheless, those that do survive, live with such a strength that it is truly awe inspiring. This book deals with a lot of things, including the horrors of the war itself, the world wide political situation during and maybe even after the war; the economic difficulties faced by the Vietnamese as well as certain allied nations; the cruelty of the communist regime; the dichotomy of socialism as seen and experienced by the people; the beauty and strength as well as the love of certain individuals, which help in making living a better deal and finally the divide between the North and the South and the reason for an existing underlying animosity and guilt.

Kim, the protagonist of this book and the girl in the picture, had it really easy in the early years of her life. South Vietnam was bountiful and the smaller towns and villages in that area had always known richness in terms of food and basic necessities. Also, the landscape of South Vietnam was truly beautiful. The North, on the other hand, were not so lucky. Having been invaded by the Japanese and the French, the northern parts were not allowed to grow rich as those in the south were.

The war between the two halves of a country for its unification can be termed as being inevitable, especially given the contrast between the two regions in terms of their individual growth. Additionally, the north would have otherwise lived in the constant fear of being taken over by another country, which would mean losing their independence. Whatever the reason, war happened and left in its wake a country that was totally ruined in terms of loss of life but more importantly in terms of loss of stability.

It was in this unstable country that Kim would have to recover and survive, which was obviously a tough task for her and others with her. This book through its beautiful yet simple prose leads us to the various actions by the American army, the guerilla warfare as indulged in by the Viet Cong and the apathy of the civilians in the South due to this incessant yet unnecessary firings and deaths.

It also shows the responsibility of the press during such situations, of course, like with most wars the press is neither consistent nor always fulfilling its responsibilities diligently. The book also deals with the beliefs and faith of the people in the South. Religion, especially the Caodai religion, was still prominent in the South, which was another major difference it had with the Communist North, where religion is nothing but following your leader or comrade.

There are situations where this faith and belief is questioned by the protagonist and the pain that she goes through for asking such questions. In fact, the book is written realistically in that no experience is honey coated or exaggerated. It flows naturally and the reader never thinks of questioning the veracity of the events that the books talk about. Of course, it could also be because I have been to Vietnam and have looked at all the places that this book mentions, so I know something of the war and its effect and impact on the people both in the North and the South.

The book talks of people living in tunnels during the course of this war. I have personally visited the tunnels both in Cu-Chi in the south as well as those near the Demilitarized Zone in the North and I have just one word to say — Horrible! Although both the north and the south made sure that people could live in the tunnels, the tunnels by themselves are so narrow and short and dark that one feels claustrophobic to enter them. While some areas a person can go with just a bend of a head if that person is 5ft tall there are other places when you have to crawl to move ahead and those are not the worst part of these tunnels.

The Cu-Chi tunnels as well as those in the north had fitted some of the entrances with curious yet fatal sharp steel rods, which led to instant death of the enemy. Gory was the picture that one got from visiting these tunnels and let me tell you that I personally baulked from going through those tunnels where you had to crawl.

I wondered then and still wonder as to how the people of those regions actually managed to live and survive a war in those times. Truly awe inspiring indeed. During my visit there, as curious as I was to see the war museums and other places, including the tunnels; there was a film of quiet that fell on the locals. The North are somehow still ashamed or rather repentant of the war in some ways as they act as if it never took place or are silent to any talk about it, although they do have their own casualties and other problems.

In the South, according to one guide who took us through Cu-Chi tunnels, the people hated those from the north for ruining their growth. Both this book and a trip to Vietnam is recommended. I had a ball of a time there with the locals, who became very good friends of mine. I have traveled extensively in that country from north to south and felt a sense of belonging that I have never ever felt before. I'd rather play at hug o' war, Where everyone hugs Instead of tugs, Where everyone giggles And rolls on the rug, Where everyone kisses, And everyone grins, And everyone cuddles, And everyone wins.

View all 9 comments. Sep 15, Sarah rated it really liked it Shelves: memoir-biography , military-government. At first glance, The Girl in the Picture is the incredible and inspiring account of a young girl; a victim of war. Look a little closer, though, and you will find a powerful deconstruction of wartime politics and moving commentary about humanity itself. For the world to see a child running in terror from an earth-shaking explosion; to see her body and clothes burned away from the excruciatingly painful napalm boiling into her bones; to look straight into her eyes and identify with her humanity… At first glance, The Girl in the Picture is the incredible and inspiring account of a young girl; a victim of war.

For the world to see a child running in terror from an earth-shaking explosion; to see her body and clothes burned away from the excruciatingly painful napalm boiling into her bones; to look straight into her eyes and identify with her humanity… this is a picture to end a war. Today we can claim no legitimate progress.

Over 40 years have come and gone and yet our response to war seems no different. Kim Phuc is a strong human being with a wonderful heart. She has suffered through a lifetime of pain and poverty only to overcome her suffering and harden her resolve to forgive, to promote peace, to offer help in whatever ways she is able. That is true humanity. But Kim Phuc is not the only one, she is not the only victim. Her picture has changed the world, but we have found ourselves in a new war, with new horrors and new victims. I want to know— Where is the picture that will end this war?

Where is the picture that will end all war? This was a photo taken by Nick Ut. This book is the story of Kim Phuc, her family, before and during the war, and her life afterwards, and how it affected those around her, and those closest to her. When I first ordered this book, I knew it was going to be heart wrenching, and hard to read. The more I read of this book, a chapter at a time, the more I feel sick to my stomach.

To see how everything happened throughout Vietnam, and how the war affected them, and their own government, makes this a really hard read. Continuing to read how the injustice in Vietnam continued to affect Kim Phuc throughout the years, continuing into her adult life was just unfair. So many tears came to my eyes reading the words on the page, and it was heart breaking. It was heart breaking to see her own government use her for their own selfish gain, because of this horrible thing that happened to her.

What I was reading was just. Heart wrenching. But also awe-inspiring. Phuc went through so much, and yet she still stood so strong, and did what she could to be her own person, and I just. Felt so inspired reading this. The images painted in my mind through this was horrifying. One that shows the true amount of forgiveness, and how forgiveness and hope can be healing. It should not be thought of with pity, or as just the girl in the photo. Kim Phuc should be remembered for the work she has done, for the hope and forgiveness she has inspired within thousands, maybe millions of people.

Data Protection Choices

She should be thought of with hope. Her name should be synonymous with inspiration and hope. Nov 17, Jessica rated it really liked it. Ugh, just lost my big long review mid-type. Short version here now that I am ticked off: -Liked this book a lot. Well written book about an interesting topic and person. Innocence, pain, strength, struggle, forgiveness. A view of the world that only includes your own experience is woefully inadequate.

The feeling of helplessness when Kim was so badly burned. Knowing you can't do a lot and having to still try anyway. The Girl in the Picture deals primarily with Vietnamese and American relationships during the Vietnam War, while examining themes of war, racism, immigration, political turmoil, repression, poverty, and international relationships through the lens of family and particularly through the eyes and everyday lives of women.

See more of Nick Ut's images from the terrifying napalm strike

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. In this Vietnamese name , the family name is Phan. Forgiveness made me free from hatred. I still have many scars on my body and severe pain most days but my heart is cleansed. Napalm is very powerful, but faith, forgiveness, and love are much more powerful. We would not have war at all if everyone could learn how to live with true love, hope, and forgiveness.

If that little girl in the picture can do it, ask yourself: Can you? The New York Times. June 11, Retrieved August 18, Nine-year-old Phan Thi Kim-Phuc is recuperating in a Saigon children's hospital, the unintended victim of a misdirected napalm attack The Boston Globe. On June 8, , Phuc, her family, other villagers and South Vietnamese soldiers had been hiding in a temple for three days. The day of the attack, they heard planes flying overhead.

One of the soldiers told the civilians to run away, that the plane was going to bomb the temple.


  • Survival Instincts Part 8.
  • Education in Hegel (Continuum Studies in Educational Research).
  • French Rosette Baby Dress Knitting Pattern;
  • The Story Behind the 'Napalm Girl' Photo Censored by Facebook;
  • The True Story Behind “Napalm Girl”!
  • Favole del Mondo: arabe, africane, cinesi, giapponesi, russe. (Italian Edition)?
  • Read More From TIME.

The Telegraph. Retrieved January 6, The Pulitzer Prizes. World Press Photo. Retrieved May 18, Aarne Rintala — Surgeon treated girl burned with napalm. Helsingin Sanomat. Helsinki : Sanoma. Retrieved November 28, A plastic surgeon remembers.


  • Explore Other Photographs From The 100.
  • Then Bud Said to Barry, Who Told Bob. . .: The Best Oklahoma Sooners Stories Ever Told (Best Sports Stories Ever Told).
  • THE DAY THE FISH DIED Part 2;
  • The Terror of War!
  • ​The girl in the picture - CBS News.
  • ​The girl in the picture - CBS News.
  • Babyland.

Lieto , Finland : Finnreklama. December 15, Archived from the original on December 15, Phuc, who created a foundation devoted to helping child victims of war, will speak at the Fenn School in Concord on Tuesday as part of the fourth annual Multicultural Educators Forum. Some seats are available to the public, and can be reserved by e-mailing Jennifer Youk See at jyouksee fenn. Phuc will address how schools can develop the qualities of empathy, respect and forgiveness.

Phuc lived in Trang Bang, north of Saigon, when the war started. On June 8, , Phuc, her family, other villagers and South Vietnamese soldiers had been hiding in a temple for three days.

Nick Ut's 'napalm girl' photo was published 42 years ago - Poynter

The day of the attack, they heard planes flying overhead. One of the soldiers told the civilians to run away, that the plane was going to bomb the temple. Phuc went outside and saw the plane getting closer, and then heard the sound of four bombs hitting the ground. Suddenly, I saw my left arm burning.

I used my right hand to try to take it off. Her left hand was damaged, too. Her clothes burned off. She saw her brothers, her cousins, and some soldiers running, too. He poured water over my body.